Types of Ghosts in Popular Folklore

Types of Ghosts in Popular Folklore
Types of Ghosts in Popular Folklore

The resulting list of ghosts for reference was gathered from many different pieces of folklore.

Acheri

In Native American folklore, the Acheri is the ghost of a girl who died a horrible, sickly death. It is thought she returns from the spirit world to live in the hills and mountain tops. At night the Acheri travels through the valleys to spread a shadow of illness over sleeping children.

Acheri
Acheri

Afrit

The Afrit is a powerful winged demon of fire, born from blood. This demon is said to rise like a dark vapour from the blood of victims of murder. Given the unjust way this demon comes to life, so to speak, it is said it instills appalling terror and brutality into its prey.

Afrit
Afrit

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Akop

In Filipino folklore, a large head with slim arms and legs, the Akop attends funerals in order to get close to the grieving widow/widower. When the spouse is not looking, the Akop will collect the body fat which seeps out of the corpse in its decomposing state, and devour it.

Akop
Akop

Ankou

Is part of the fairy lore of the Celtic countries. He has largely been forgotten in Cornwall, Wales and Ireland but remains part of the living folklore in French Brittany. Ankou is the personification of death who comes to collect the souls of passed over humans. He is male dark, wearing a black robed costume pulled up high about his head and a large hat that conceals his face. No one living has ever seen his face, for to do so would be to die. He is sometimes depicted as the Grim Reaper sporting a scythe with a handle of human bone.

An Ankou comes about when the last person in a calendar year dies in a parish. Their job, for the next year, is to guide the dead souls away from their bodies.

Ankou
Ankou

Aonyoubou

Aonyoubou, Blue Wife, is a form of Goryu, an angry ghost. The most famous Goryu is Michizane Sugawara, commonly known as Tennjin. Humans killed for political reasons are particularly prone to be angry ghosts.

Aonyoubou
Aonyoubou

Aswang

In Philippine folklore, Aswangs are shape shifters who live among their human neighbors and carry on a regular life. At night they morph into various creatures in order to hunt their prey, mainly young children and unborn fetuses which they suck out and devour directly from the mother's womb.

Aswang
Aswang

Aumakua

A traditional Hawaiian saying tells us that Aumakua are: Ano lani, ano honua. This means an Aumakua is a being of both a heavenly and an earthly nature. An Aumakua is an ancestor that has died and has come back in a different form. An Aumakua usually communicates with, helps, inspires, and guides members of the family.

Aumakua
Aumakua

Bakechochin

In Japanese folklore, the Bakechochin is the soul of a person who died in anger. If the lantern is lit the spirit will come out and haunt those who are present. It immediately attacks who ever lit the lantern.

Bakechochin
Bakechochin

Banshee

In Irish folklore, Banshees are female spirits or wraiths. These ghostly wailing women often appear to people as an omen of impending death and, are often heard wailing loudly at their funeral. Most often a Banshee will appear as a young women with pale bluish skin and long hair that floats ghost like on the wind.

Banshee
Banshee

Barghest

In English lore, a mythical goblin from the North of England, predominantly in Yorkshire, to a legendary monstrous black dog with huge teeth and claws, and is an omen of death or other misfortune.

Barghest
Barghest

Bhut/Bhoot

In British lore, the restless ghost of a deceased person, usually appearing in human form but with backward facing feet. Bhoots tend to appear in white, often floating above the ground or in trees, and cast no shadow.

Bhut/Bhoot
Bhut/Bhoot

Black Shuck, or Old Shuck

Found in East Anglia, England. The Black Shuck is very similar to the other black dogs appearance, except he is said to be as large as a donkey and is sometimes seen with only one eye that can glow with either red or green fire. This dog is often seen on roads, marshes, alongside rivers, and guarding cemeteries

Black Shuck, or Old Shuck
Black Shuck, or Old Shuck

Bogey, or Bogie

In English folklore, evil spirits that travel alone or together to do harm and/or mischief.

Bogey, or Bogie
Bogey, or Bogie

Boggart

In English folklore, a boggart is a fae creature, known for its relentless mischief. It is part of a collection of bugbear type spirits, which also include bogles, boogies and boogeymen. It is also considered to be related to brownies but is differentiated for being less helpful than a brownie and more malicious than a boogie.

It is said their appearance resembles a gnome, albeit one with tattered and dusty clothing. They are rarely seen but make themselves known by minor mishaps and persistent noises after dark.

Like all bugbears, they are clumsy creatures and prefer cluttered, semi dark areas to hide in. They will serve themselves a nuisance to the homestead with such acts as causing milk to go sour, disrupting sleep-especially that of babies, stealing, frightening pets, leaving taps running, and more.

They are considered very difficult to be rid of, especially if named. Once an infestation is bad enough there is no known method of appeasing or reasoning with it. Home owners will be forced to act in a manner more annoying than the boggart to drive it off. If that does not work the lodgers are advised to move house as swiftly as possible, so that the boggart does not hear of the plans and hitch a ride.

Boggart
Boggart

Brownies/Pixies

In English and Scottish folklore, house faeries that do odd jobs about a house and farm, cleaning, tidying up, or helping with the brewing, usually go naked, dress in rags, or wear a brown hood and mantle, an offer of clothes will cause them to leave. If offended, they turn into Boggarts.

Brownies/Pixies
Brownies/Pixies

Boo Hag

In Gullah folklore, similar to vampires. Unlike vampires, they gain sustenance from a person's breath, as opposed to their blood, by riding their victims. They have no skin, and thus are red. In order to be less conspicuous, they will steal a victim's skin and use it for as long as it holds out, wearing it as one might wear clothing. They will remove and hide this skin before going riding.

When a hag determines a victim is suitable for riding, the hag will generally gain access to the home through a small crack, crevice, or hole. The hag will then position themselves over the sleeping victim, sucking their breath. This act renders the victim helpless, and induces a deep dream filled sleep. The hag tends to leave the victim alive, so as to use them again for their energy. However, if the victim struggles, the hag may take their skin, leaving the victim to suffer. After taking the victim's energy, the hag flies off, as they must be in their skin by dawn or be forever trapped without skin. When the victim awakes, they may feel short of breath, but generally the victim only feels tired.

Boo Hag
Boo Hag

Bucca

A storm spirit in Cornish folklore, formerly believed to inhabit mines and coastal communities. It was once thought necessary to propitiate. Fishermen left a fish on the sands for Bucca, and in harvest a piece of bread at lunch time was thrown over the left shoulder, and a few drops of beer spilled on the ground for him, to insure good luck.

Bucca
Bucca

Buer

In German folklore, is one of the great presidents of hell, appears in several different forms.

This demon is seen mostly as it is shown here with a lions head at the center of a circle of five goat legs, allowing him to move in any direction. At other times Buer is depicted as looking like a centaur.

Buer
Buer

Buruburu

In Japanese folklore, is the ghost of fear. It lives in the forests and graveyards. It takes the form of a shaking old man or woman and sometime only has one eye. It will attach itself to the back of its victim sending a chill up and down the spine. The selected victim then dies of fright.

Buruburu
Buruburu

Calling Ghosts

Similar to sirens of Greek mythology, calling ghosts lure people to death by calling their names.

Calling Ghosts
Calling Ghosts

Cihuateteo or Divine Women

In Aztec folklore, childbirth is viewed as a battle of sorts and women who died during childbirth were viewed as fallen warriors. In death, these Cihuateteo or divine women are feared and known for causing both physical and mental illness and stealing children.

Their physical remains were thought to strengthen soldiers in battle while their spirits became the much feared Cihuateteo, who accompanied the setting sun in the west. They also haunted crossroads at night, stealing children and causing sicknesses, especially seizures and madness, and seducing men to sexual misbehavior.

Their images appear with the beginning day signs of the five western trecena:

1 Deer

1 Rain

1 Monkey

1 House

1 Eagle

During which they were thought to descend to the earth and cause particularly dangerous mischief. They are depicted with skeletal faces and with eagle claws for hands.

Cihuateteo or Divine Women
Cihuateteo or Divine Women

Ch'iang Shih

In Chinese folklore, A vampire created when a recently deceased corpse is possessed by a Demon, usually after suicide or a violent death without a proper burial. Unlike western vampires it is covered with white or green hair over its entire body. The Chiang Shih has long claws, teeth and glowing red eyes. Breathing it's breath can be lethal. If given time to mature it could learn to fly and change into a wolf.

Ch'iang Shih
Ch'iang Shih

Churel

In Indian folklore, A churel, also spelled chuail, cuail or cuel is a female ghost. Women who die in childbirth or pregnancy due to the negligence of her relatives are often described turning into churels, who return to seek their vendetta and suck the blood of their male relatives. The churel is described to have a hideous and terrible appearance, however she appears in the devious disguise of a youthful, beautiful maiden to lure young men. She drains their blood, semen, and virility, transforming them into aged men. She dwells and prowls in places associated with death and filth.

Churel
Churel

Chindi

In Native American Navajo beliefs, is that a person’s Chindi is released when his or her final breath is taken. The Chindi contains all of that person’s accumulated sins of a lifetime. If the decedent is allowed to pass on outdoors, the Chindi will eventually fade away on its own. It usually takes the shape of a dust devil. If it spins clockwise, that’s a good thing but counterclockwise, not so much. This indicates that the Chindi contained much evil.

On the other hand, if a person dies inside a home or a hogan, this is a bad thing. The Chindi now occupies the dwelling, which must either be abandoned and destroyed, or ritually cleansed.

Chindi
Chindi

Cihuateteo

In Aztec beliefs, childbirth was viewed as a battle of sorts. Women who died during childbirth were regarded as fallen warriors and honored as such. Given the pain they went through during their death, their haunting abilities were not welcomed. In death, these women were feared, and known for causing illness, and not just physically, they mainly caused mental illness. It is said they were responsible for stealing children, given that they were taken from their offspring at their time of death.spirits of women who died during childbirth and haunted the living to steal their children.

Cihuateteo
Cihuateteo

Coco

In Portuguese folklore, Côco refers to a ghost with a pumpkin head. It is said that the Coco would sit atop houses in the shadows, seeking out misbehaving children. Parents would sing rhymes, warning their children that if they did not obey them, the Coco would come and eat them.

Coco
Coco

Control

The spirit of someone who has died that acts as a go between for a psychic medium and the spirit realm.

Control
Control

Dames Blanches

In French folklore, like beautiful trolls, these White Ladies eternally await in bridges for handsome young men who need to cross. What interests these beauties is the simple joy of dance, and a willing partner. When a young man tries to cross the bridge, they ask him to dance with them. If the man agrees, she will let him pass without any problems, and he will be none the wiser to her potential danger. However, those unlucky men who are not suitable dance partners, and who refuse the invitation will be thrown off the bridge.

Dames Blanches
Dames Blanches

Deogen - Originally named De Ogen

In Belgian folklore, a ghost appears to take the form of an oddly colored fog. Modern accounts describe it as greenish, although it may also be gray, orange, or white. Small, shadowy figures may be seen darting through the fog, particularly by drivers of vehicles passing through the area, and small handprints may be seen briefly on car windows before quickly fading away. The laughter of children may also be heard floating out from the mist. Targets sometimes report something large staring at them from within the fog, hence the name Deogen or De Ogen, Dutch for The Eyes.

Deogen
Deogen

Dobhar-chú

In Irish folklore, is a creature and a cryptid. Dobhar-chú is roughly translated into water hound. It resembles both a dog and an otter though sometimes is described as a half dog, half fish. It lives in water and has fur with protective properties. Many sightings have been documented down through the years. Most recently in 2003 Irish artist and his wife claim to have witnessed a Dobhar-chú on Omey Island in Connemara, County Galway. In the description the large dark creature made a haunting screech, could swim fast and had orange flipper like feet.

A headstone, found in Conwall cemetery in Glenade, County Leitrim depicts the Dobhar-chú and is related to a tale of an attack on a local woman by the creature. The stone is claimed to be the headstone of a grave of a woman killed by the Dobhar-chú in the 17th century. Her name was supposedly Gráinne. Her husband supposedly heard her scream as she was washing clothes down at Glenade lough, County Leitrim and came to her aid. When he got there she was already dead, with the Dobhar-chú upon her bloody and mutilated body. The man killed the Dobhar-chú, stabbing it in the heart. As it died, it made a whistling noise, and its mate arose from the lough.

Its mate chased the man but, after a long and bloody battle, he killed it as well.

Dobhar-chú
Dobhar-chú

Domovik

In Russian folklore, The Domovik is a protective spirit or mythical being that can be found in Slavic and Russian folklore, known as Domovoi in Russia, it takes the form of a small old man with a distinctive grey beard who lives behind or under the stove, every Russian home is said to have a resident domovik spirit. The Domovik are said to be able to shape shift, taking the form of small animals such as cats, rats or snakes, they are also known to take care of horses for households that have stables, protecting them as he does the home. The Domovik will also be on good terms with the Domovik of neighboring houses unless they are caught stealing from his home in which case revenge will be carried out.

Domovik
Domovik

Doppleganger

German for double goer, also see Fetch. It is a look alike or double of a living person, sometimes portrayed as a paranormal phenomenon, and in some traditions as a harbinger of bad luck. In other traditions and stories, they recognize your Doppleganger as an evil twin.

Doppleganger
Doppleganger

Dorje Shugden

In Tibetan culture, also known as Dolgyal, was a gyalpo, angry and vengeful spirit of South Tibet, which was subsequently adopted as a minor protector of the Gelug school. A malevolent, powerful ghost monk from the 1600s known for splitting the community.

Dorje Shugden
Dorje Shugden

Double or Fetch

A Double is a supernatural double or an apparition of a living person in Irish folklore. It is largely akin to the Doppelgänger, and sightings are regarded as omens, usually for impending death.

Double
Double

Draugen

In Norwegian folklore, a draugr or Old Norse, is a wicked water ghost entity. These ghosts are said to be the ghosts of sailors or fishermen who lost their lives at sea. They then are doomed to haunt the waves. In these tales any man who takes to the sea dreads meeting up with this entity. The Draugen is described as being monstrous in size covered in seaweed. He is seen only after dark during stormy seas. He is always seen rowing the remnants of his shattered boat. The legend states that the unlucky sailors that encounter him are first alerted to his presence by his terrible screams.

Draugen
Draugen

Duppy

In Jamaican folklore, means ghost, spirit or a malevolent supernatural being. They view the Duppy as a powerful being that can visit anytime of the day or night, and cause whatever havoc or pain necessary to invoke the greatest amount of fear in their chosen victim.

Duppy
Duppy

Ekimmu

In Assyrian lore, a demonic, phantom like entity that roamed the earth, unable to obtain solace, searching for victims. Also referenced as evil wind gusts, according to Sumerian mythology, wind is often shown as a expression of psychic or apparitional power. an evil ghost condemned to wander the earth.

Ekimmu
Ekimmu

El Cucuy

In Latin American folklore, is a shapeshifting entity that hides under children's beds or within closets. It is a bad, evil entity that often preys on children by kidnapping them or making them disappear. Typically the children who are taken by the Cucuy are children who misbehave or do things they are not supposed to do. Many consider El Cucuy to be the opposite of the Guardian Angel, he is the original boogeyman that everyone fears.

El Cucuy
El Cucuy

El Silbon Ghost, or The Whistler

In Venezuelan folklore, the frightening lost spirit of a young man who killed his father, who now carries his bones in a bag while remaining upon the earth. According to legend, the ghost is a black hearted young man who murdered his father in cold blood and devoured his organs. El Silbón is now doomed to wander the earth as a lost soul, lugging a bag filled with his father's bones. The Whistler gets his name from the eerie, bone chilling whistling sound he emits. Beware: When the whistling sounds far away, El Silbón is actually near by.

El Silbon Ghost
El Silbon Ghost

El Sombreron

In Guatemalan lore, serves as a cautionary bogeyman, particularly for young girls. As his name might suggest, he goes about wearing an enormous hat, a black one, in fact. He’s said to dress entirely in black, save for his ornamental boots and belt and other bling. He is said to be a type of goblin or ghost that travels with a pack of mules in the evening and delights in braiding the hair of young women.

El Sombreron
El Sombreron

Eurynomos

In Greek mythology, Eurynomus is said to feed off the rotting flesh of corpses, and his body coloration reflects that of a meat fly. Commonly depicted with a coat of fox fur covering his back, he is a sly parasite that feasts on dead pickings.

Eurynomos
Eurynomos

Faceless Woman

In many cultures, a frightening female ghost, often seen from behind, that turns around but without a face.

Faceless Woman
Faceless Woman

Fairies

In many cultures, especially in the United Kingdom, a tiny spirit being that can either help or harm mankind.

Fairies
Fairies

Familiar

A familiar, or familiar spirit or familiar animal, is an animal shaped spirit or minor demon believed to serve a witch or magician as domestic servant, spy and companion, in addition to helping to bewitch enemies or to divine information.

Familiar
Familiar

Fetch

In English and Irish lore, A Fetch is a supernatural double or an apparition of a living person in Irish folklore. It is largely akin to the Doppelgänger, and sightings are regarded as omens, usually for impending death.

Fetch
Fetch

Funayure

In Japanese myth, the ghosts of drowned sailors who join a ghost ship and its crew, they travel in a great mist and try to capsize ships or bring the ships to the bottom of the sea so that the souls of the sailors of those ships joins their ghost crew.

Funayurei
Funayure

Gashadokuro

In Japanese lore, is a frightening undead giant that takes the form of a skeleton, only the skeleton is much larger than any normal human, at minimum it is 15 times taller than an average human, eternally hungry yet unable to eat in its cursed form this spirit alerts travellers of its arrival with a haunting call that sounds like bells ringing in one's ears. Anyone foolish enough to ignore this warning risked being caught by the Gashadokuro who, in its hunger, would promptly grab at its victim and if they didn't run immediatedly the spirit would proceed to literally bite their head off.

Gashadokuro
Gashadokuro

Gendruwo/Gandaruwo

Gendruwo is evil ghost, they are usually men. They have huge hairy red black body, long dirty hair, long and sharp claws, red eyes, fangs, and scary a face. If in the middle of the night you sniff a smell of roasted cassava, there's a Gendruwo there. They are known to enjoy sex, and can transform into someone's husband to have sex with her.

Pocong
Pocong

Ghoul

In Islamic lore, dwells in burial grounds and other uninhabited places. The ghul is a fiendish type of jinni believed to be sired by Iblis. A ghoul is also a desert dwelling, shapeshifting, demon that can assume the guise of an animal, especially a hyena. It lures unwary people into the desert wastes or abandoned places to slay and devour them. The creature also preys on young children, drinks blood, steals coins, and eats the dead, then taking the form of the person most recently eaten.

Ghoul
Ghoul

Green Lady

In British & Scottish folklore, is a spirit of the water, with the top half of a woman and the bottom half of a goat, similar to a satyr. Her human side is gray skinned, with long, flowing blonde hair that covers most of her body. In addition, she often tries to hide her animal side with her namesake green robe. Able to shapeshift, the Green Lady often takes on a number of roles, depending on the intent of the storyteller.

Green Lady
Green Lady

Gremlin

In British folklore, derived from the Old English word greme, which means to vex and annoy. A small, whispy, troublesome spirit seen by World War I airplane pilots inside their aircraft, when the pesky entities were routinely blamed for engine troubles, electronic failures, and any other thing that might go wrong with an airplane.

Gremlin
Gremlin

Guardian Spirit

In most cultures, a deity or spirit that protects the home, looking after the entire household or certain key members. A person's guardian spirit also called a guardian angel.

Guardian Spirit
Guardian Spirit

Hyakume

Hyakume, literally one hundred eyes, is a yokai that protects shrines from thieves. It is said that if you steal from a shrine then one of hyakume‘s eyes will chase after you until it attaches itself to you. It is possible that this is related to the symbol that was tattooed on convicted thieves.

Hyakume
Hyakume

Iele

In Romanian myth, female fairy like spirits who seduce men and possess magical skills. They appear sometimes with bodies, other times only as immaterial spirits. They are young and beautiful, voluptuous, immortals, their frenzy causing delirium to the watchers, with bad tempers, but not being necessarily evil. They come in a group of unknown numbers, either in a group of seven, and sometimes in groups of three.

Iele
Iele

Ikiryph

In Japanese lore, an evil spirit created by a person's bad thoughts and feelings.

Ikiryph
Ikiryph

Isogashi

Isogashi is the Japanese word for busy, and is an invisible spirit that possesses people and drives them to busyness.

Isogashi
Isogashi

Jack-in-Irons

In English folklore, A Yorkshire spirit who haunts lonely places attired in heavy chains. The spirit was said to attack travellers.

Jack-in-Irons
Jack-in-Irons

Jack-o-Lantern

In British lore, According to Irish folklore, a man called Jack O’Lantern was sentenced to roam the earth for eternity. A ghostly figure of the night, O’Lantern walks with a burning coal inside of a carved out turnip to light his way. A wandering ghost seen as a light that, if followed, will cause a person to become lost.

Jack-o-Lantern
Jack-o-Lantern

Jimmy Squarefoot

In English lore, a phantom or ghost with a pig's head and two tusks like those of a wild boar. Jimmy Squarefoot, the name of the man who became the odd phantom, haunts the Grenaby district of the Isle of Man. Accoording to lore, at one time it was a giant pig which carried around a stone throwing giant, a Foawr. As a mortal, Jimmy, too, was a stone thrower, his favorite target being his wife. She ultimately left him, after which it seems he assumed his semi human form and roamed the land.

Jimmy Squarefoot
Jimmy Squarefoot

Kachina

In Native American beliefs, an ancestor spirit who acts as an intermediate between the Hopi people and the gods.

Kachina
Kachina

Kan Hotidan

In Native American beliefs, a powerful & feared elf like tree spirit that lived in tree stumps and preyed on unwary travelers

Kan Hotidan
Kan Hotidan

Kelpie or Water Kelpie

In Scottish lore, A kelpie is a shape changing aquatic spirit, Its name may derive from the Scottish Gaelic words cailpeach or colpach, meaning heifer or colt. Kelpies are said to haunt rivers and streams, usually in the shape of a horse. These are malevolent spirits. The kelpie may appear as a tame pony beside a river. It is particularly attractive to children, but they should take care, for once on its back, its sticky magical hide will not allow them to dismount. Once trapped in this way, the kelpie will drag the child into the river and then eat him. A nefarious water spirit that, if sighted, foretells of death.

Kelpie
Kelpie

Kere

In Greek folklore, that little trouble maker,was a spirit of the dead, in ancient Greece.It was believed that Keres escaped from the pithos which were jars used to contain the bodies of the dead and devoted themselves to pestering the living. They were exorcised by ritual and incantations. Sticky tar was painted on door frames to catch them and prevent them from entering a dwelling.

In mythology, Keres are akin to goddesses of death who originally escaped from Pandora's box. They served the will of the gods, and their chief functions were to carry off the corpses of the dead and to inflict the living with disease and illnesses.

Kere
Kere

Knocker or Tommyknocker

In in Welsh, Cornish and Devon folklore. They are mythical creatures, the equivalent of Irish leprechauns and English and Scottish brownies. About 2' tall and grizzled, but not misshapen, they live beneath the ground. Here they wear tiny versions of standard miner's garb and commit random mischief, such as stealing miners' unattended tools and food.

Knocker or Tommyknocker
Knocker or Tommyknocker

Kobold

In Germanic lore, a small, pointy eared, goblin like creature with a short temper and a mischievous spirit. While generally described as well intentioned, angering a kobold is said to be a dangerous mistake. They are described as spirits that dwell among the living, and can sometimes take the form of humans, elements, or animals, depending upon where they choose to make their home.

Kobold
Kobold

Konaki-Jiji

In Japanese folklore, is formed from the soul of a child left to die of exposure in the mountains, the size and shape of an infant. Oddly, its face is that of an elderly man. It is always crying like a baby and lurks in secluded areas, like mountain paths, where babies shouldn't normally be. When a kind hearted traveler comes by and hears the crying, he will pick the yokai up in an effort to comfort it. When the traveler notices the odd face, the konaki-jiji attacks. It will increase its weight tremendously, crushing the foolhardy good Samaritan.

Konaki-Jiji
Konaki-Jiji

Krasue

In Southeast Asian lore, represented by the head of a good looking young woman, that floats in the air, entrails, spine, and other assorted bloody organs dangling from its neck. The spirit feeds on blood, feces, fetuses, and other gory things, and is believed to take a particularly disturbing interest in pregnant women. If there's blood or feces spread on your house in the morning, that's a sign the Krasue has been there. It is seen at night time.

Krasue
Krasue

Kubikajiri

In Japanese lore, a headless ghost is a head eating ghost that lives in graveyards and as is seen late at night searching for its head. It feasts on the heads of the living and the dead alike. One can smell the creature before it is seen because it smells of fresh blood.

Kubikajiri
Kubikajiri

Kuntilanak

In Malaysian lore, people believe that Kuntilanak is a pregnant woman who die before the baby is born. They using a long white clothes, long black hair, scary face, and scary laugh. They usually stayed above a big tree and really like to disturb someone who pass the tree. They're laugh loudly if they can make someone afraid and run away. They also can transform into beautiful women and stop some drivers or riders. Usually they're gonna ask drivers/riders to go to somewhere, and they ended up in the grave or even cliffs.

Pocong
Pocong

La Llorona

In Mexican folklore, a crying female ghost, a beautiful woman by the name of Maria who drowns her children in the Mexican river as a means of revenge because her husband left her for a younger woman. She soon realizes that her children are dead, so she drowns herself in a river in Mexico City. Challenged at the gates of Heaven as to the whereabouts of her children, she is not permitted to enter the afterlife until she has found them. Maria is forced to wander the Earth for all eternity, searching in vain for her drowned offspring, with her constant weeping giving her the name La Llorona. She is trapped in between the living world and the spirit world.

She will take any child that vaguely resembles her own, and then drag them into the water in the hopes she may finally be admitted to what awaits us after death.

La Llorona
La Llorona

La Planchada

In Mexican lore, was a nurse who was attracted to a doctor and he rejected her, or a disgruntled nurse, or a nurse who killed her patient. Many variations of how she was created exist, but one consistent theme is that her ghost appears in many hospitals, though mainly in the metropolitan areas, especially in Mexico City.

La Planchada
La Planchada

La Siguanaba

In Central American folklore, shapeshifting spirit in Central America folklore, who resembles an attractive woman from the back, long haired and often naked, or wearing a gauzy white dress. Men come upon her while she's bathing on dark nights. They don't see her real face, a horse face or human skull, until she's lured them into danger, or gotten them hopelessly lost. In Guatemala, the Siguanaba usually appears to punish unfaithful men.

La Siguanaba
La Siguanaba

La Sayona

In Venezuelan folklore, is an avenging spirit or monster who preys on unfaithful men, and mutilate her victims. She will appear as a beautiful and seductive woman, but is really a rotting corpse or skeleton, concealed by her clothing.

La Sayona
La Sayona

Lares/Manes

In ancient Roman beliefs, good ghosts of people who dwellt with the living. Its the general name by which the Romans designated the souls of the departed; but as it is a natural tendency to consider the souls of departed friends as blessed spirits, spirits of the dead thought to be good in demeanor. The name of Lares is frequently used as synonymous with Manes.

Lares/Manes
Lares/Manes

Lemures/Larvae

In ancient Roman beliefs, vampirelike ghosts of the dead, also called larvae. They were the souls of dead people who could find no rest, either owing to their own guilt, or from having met with some indignity, such as a violent death. They were supposed to wander abroad in the form of dreadful spectres, skeletons, etc., and especially to strike the living with madness.To exorcise these malevolent spirits from the home, the Romans held rites, the Lemuria

Lemures/Larvae
Lemures/Larvae

Liekkiö

In Finnish lore, is a ghost or a soul of a murdered child buried in the woods, Liekkiö didn't do any harm, but sometimes distracted travelling people by crying and whining. In some sources Liekkiös looked like flames, or as a light form, similar to will-o'-the-wisps.

Liekko
Liekkiö

Mare

In Swedish folklore, is a female Vette, who gives people bad dreams at night by sitting on them in their sleep.

Mare
Mare

Matagot

In French lore, and is basically a spirit in animal form. Among its favorite forms include black cat, dog, cow, fox or even rat. While considered to be evil, other accounts say that matagots or mandagots can be actually helpful and could even bring wealth to a home if it is well fed, especially with fresh and plump chicken. There are plenty of versions on How To Care for Your Matagot, but the bottomline is, if you get something out of it, expect to give something in return, too.

Matagot
Matagot

Melusine

In French folklore, is a Siren, or a mermaid like creature of faerie, and has the innate abilities to breathe water, immortality as long as she is not killed using magic or cold iron, and to bespell by singing. In addition she has also studied magic and can cast many spells which can change her form, create magical shields of protection, transport her or others through the dimensions foresee the future, astral project, give another superhuman power, communicate with animals, swim through the air as though it was water, and create mental links with others. Apart from her memorised spells, she has many others in her books that she can cast as needed.

Melusine
Melusine

Menehune

In Hawaiian folklore, are said to be dwarf like people who live in the forests and hidden valleys of Hawaii and hide from humans. Legend has it that they lived in Hawaii even before the Polynesian settlers and that they were excellent craftsmen, completing astounding engineering feats like the Menehune Fish Pond on Kauai. They are also said to have constructed an aqueduct called the Menehune Ditch on Kauai, which was built prior to Western contact and is considered an engineering masterpiece because the rocks are carefully squared and smoothed to create a watertight seal, and they are said to have built it in one night.

Menehune
Menehune

Mononoke or Yokai

In Japanese lore, noisy ghosts that live within inanimate objects near temples or burial sites. Vengeful spirits, dead spirits, live spirits, or spirits in Japanese classical literature and folk religion that were said to do things like possess individuals and make them suffer, cause disease, or even cause death.

Mononoke or Yokai
Mononoke or Yokai

Moroaica

In Romanian lore, a ghost who walks among the living and who drains energy from them. Most commonly they are females. They have red hair, blue eyes, twin hearts, and red patches on their faces. They can drain the life energy from animals, plant life, and humans. They gather with others of their kind living and undead to teach one another black magic. They drink honey straight from the hive, the bees that live there die afterwards. They can shapeshift into glowing balls, of light, cats, dogs, ravens, or wolves.

Moroaica
Moroaica

Murmur

Murmur is one of 72 spirits of Solomon. He is also said to be a Great Duke and Earl of Hell. Murmur is one of 3 demons that is said to sway over the dead and move corpses from grave to grave.

Murmur
Murmur

Nasnas

In Arabic folklore, is believed to be the offspring of a Shiqq, and a human. A Shiqq is a lower form of jinn, demon spirit, and is a half creature that is monstrous in appearance. This crossbreeding resulted in the creation of a half human body, yet one that is still very agile. It's believed it can kill a person by just touching them and the person would be fleshless in mere seconds.

Nasnas
Nasnas

Nix or Nixe

In German folklore, is a water spirit that appear mostly in the form of a human body with a fish tail, although they can appear as a human, fish, snake, horse or dragon. In general, living humans are not what the Nix/Nixe seek, but it is believed they must perform one human sacrifice a year.

Nix or Nixe
Nix or Nixe

Noppera-bo

In Japanese folklore, It is a faceless demon commonly mistaken for the Mujina. They are known to frighten people, but are harmless. At first, they appear as a family member or a friend of the victim. They will later make their face disappear, causing the victim to panic.

Noppera-bo
Noppera-bo

Nureonna

Nureonna has the body of a snake and the head of a woman. Exists in various sizes of up to 1000' in length, and often found on the seashore. It has a habit of sucking all the blood from its victims.

Nureonna
Nureonna

Nurikabe

In Japanese lore, It manifests as a wall that impedes or misdirects walking travelers at night. Trying to go around is futile as it extends itself forever. Knocking on the lower left part of the wall makes it disappear. Nurikabe appear mysteriously on roads late at night. As a traveler is walking, right before his or her eyes, an enormous, invisible wall materializes and blocks the way. There is no way to slip around this yokai; it extends itself as far as to the left and right as one might try to go. There is no way over it either, nor can it be knocked down. However, it is said that if one taps it near the ground with a stick, it will vanish, allowing the traveler to continue on his or her way.

Nurikabe
Nurikabe

Nyai Loro Kidul or Nyi Roro Kidul

In Indonesian myth, is a legendary female spirit who drowns swimmers, looking similar to a mermaid. Known as the Queen of the Southern Sea of Java.

Nyai Loro Kidul/Nyi Roro Kidul
Nyai Loro Kidul/Nyi Roro Kidul

Onryo

In Japanese folklore, are female ghosts who suffered at the hands of their lover. These ghosts dwell in the physical world seeking vengeance on those who wronged them. These ghosts are in their element when torturing their hurtful lover to the point of insanity or death.

Onryo
Onryo

Pele

In Hawaiian folklore, a goddess of the goddess of fire, lightning, wind, dance and volcanoes. Often seen in the form of a ghost. A well known character, Otherwise known as ka wahine ai honua, the woman who devours the land, Pele’s home is believed to be Halemaumau crater at the summit of Kilauea, one of the world’s most active volcanoes. However, all of Hawaii lays the setting for her stories, so that to this day, any volcanic eruption in Hawaii is attributed to Pele’s longing to be with her true love.

Pele
Pele

Penanggalan

In Southeast Asian folklore, During the day the Penanggalan will appear as a normal woman, but when darkness falls her head will detach from the body, trailing her internal organs behind her, as she hunts for food. It will seek the homes of pregnant women, waiting for their child to come into the world, then she will strike with a long, invisible tongue, to feed on the blood of the newborn and the mother.

Penanggalan
Penanggalan

Pesta

In Norwegian lore, a horrible, old woman who dressed in black and went from farm to farm and brought the disease or death. The personification of the Black Death. She carried a broom and a rake. If she came with broomstick, everyone would die on the farm. If she came with a rake, some would survive.

Pesta
Pesta

Phi Tai Hong

In Thai folklore, a man or a woman who died an unnatural and violent death, such as being murdered or drowning and often without the observance of proper funerary rituals. Phi Tai Hong are very dangerous for they are usually full of resentment and may easily kill people. The spirit of a person who was assassinated will seek retribution and will eventually threaten and seek to kill the murderers, as well as people that may be close to them when the spirit is active. As a consequence Phi Tai Hong are among the most feared ghosts, especially in the form known as Tai Thang Klom or Tai Thong Klom, which is the ghost of a woman who died together with her child in her womb. There are many instances in Thailand in which people claim that such spirits are real.

Phi Tai Hong
Phi Tai Hong

Phantom Monks

In various cultures, the ghosts of religious figures such as priests usually seen near churches or religious sites.

Phantom Monks
Phantom Monks

Phantom Nuns

In various cultures, the ghosts of devout women of the church usually seen near convents or churches.

Phantom Nuns
Phantom Nuns

Phantom Travelers

In numerous cultures, ghosts of people or animals said to haunt roadways, crossroads or vehicle.

Phantom Travelers
Phantom Travelers

Pisadeira

In Brazilian folklore, is typically described as a very thin, bony woman, with short legs and messy, long hair. She has a large, hooked and pointed nose and wide, red eyes. Her fingers are long and thin and end in long yellow nails or claws. Her teeth are sharp and the inside of her mouth is coloured green.

The Pisadeira will enter the room of the victim, climb on the bed and then sit on top of the victims chest. She will then either press down or stomp on the chest and stomach of the chosen, causing slow suffocation as breathing is interrupted. Pisadeira could just throttle the victim with her powerful grip but she does in fact want to wake you.

Pisadeira
Pisadeira

Pocong

In Malaysian folklore, it is someone who has died, before they are buried, they are worn white cloth and tied at the body, above of the head and the end of the legs. People believe that after they are burried, they can go back from the grave, with dirty cloth, pale face, and sometimes with only bones, skull, and without eyes. They can back because of some 'unfinished businesses' with someone. Because their hands and legs are tied, they can't walk. They jump. And they will knock the door with their head.

Pocong
Pocong

Popobawa

In Tanzanian folklore, A fairly modern day evil spirit, the Popobawa is a shapeshifter and described as taking different forms, not just that of a bat as its name implies. It can take either human or animal form, and metamorphose from one into the other. It is said to be responsible for sneaking into homes and sexually assaulting sleeping adults, apparently engaging with men more than women. It is said that the odor of sulphur is present prior to an attack. Popobawa typically visits homesteads at night, but can also be seen in the daytime.

Popobawa
Popobawa

Preta

In Hindu and Buddhist beliefs, Free roaming spirits that try to satisfy their desires, many are jealous, liars, or greedy in a past life, or are too attached to let go and move on to the next stage of development. Pretas are depicted as having lots of small jagged teeth, an emaciated frame, and desperately looking for food that they simply cannot eat, which is a representation of their search for the fulfillment of their desires and attachments.

Preta
Preta

Psychopomp

In Egyptian and Greek mythology, a transporter of the dead to the afterworld, or a guide, whose primary function is to escort souls to the afterlife, but they can also serve as guides through the various transitions of life.

Psychopomp
Psychopomp

Puca or Pooka

In Irish folklore, a shapeshifting, household spirit that can either be mischievous or friendly, similar to a brownie.

Puca or Pooka
Puca or Pooka

Rabisu

From Assyrian folklore, Rabisu are fallen angels that are transformed into vampiric spirits. They mainly appear human in form, with demonic features and angelic wings. On this earth they lurk in the shadows, hiding in dark recesses, waiting to attack the living as they enter their homes.

Rabisu
Rabisu

Radiant Boy

In European folklore, glowing ghosts of boys who have been murdered by their mothers, whose appearance portends doom or ill luck and violent death.

Radiant Boy
Radiant Boy

Rakshasa

In Indian lore, a type of demon or goblin form with fire for hair and whose head is adorned with entrails. Rakshasas have the power to change their shape at will and appear as animals, as monsters, or in the case of the female demons, as beautiful women. They are most powerful in the evening, particularly during the dark period of the new moon, but they are dispelled by the rising sun. They especially detest sacrifices and prayer. Most powerful among them is their king, the 10-headed Ravana Putana, a female demon, is well known for her attempt to kill the infant Krishna by offering him milk from her poisoned breast; she was, however, sucked to death by the god.

Rakshasa
Rakshasa

Rokurokubi

During the daytime look just like normal people, but at night they can stretch their necks to tremendous lengths and seem to delight in scaring people, especially it is said, drunks. There are buddhist versions of Rokurokubi that actually were humans who broke buddhist precepts, and were more bloodthirsty and demonic than other Rokurokubi.

Rokurokubi
Rokurokubi

Rusalka

In Russian myth, is a ghost female mermaid that dwells at the bottom of river. Rusalki are spirits of young women who died violently before marriage and before their natural time was up. Thus, they were cursed to live in a lake in the form of a mermaid. There they will sing sweet songs to entrap men into the water and drown them. They would also entice children with singing and then tickle them to death. Rusalka can also live on land, climb trees during the night and sing. Rusalka have pale, almost translucent skin and no visible pupils, or they sometimes have green fiery eyes. With green or golden hair, which is always wet, and some believe if her hair ever dries, she will die. Rusalka can have positive effects as she can confer her unused fertility on fields, helping crops to grow.

Rusalka
Rusalka

Screaming Skull

In English lore, a ghostly skull of a victim, religiously persecuted to death, that haunts after his or her real skull was removed from the house where it wished to remain.

Screaming Skull
Screaming Skull

Seven Whistles

In English lore, spirits that fly together and sing, or whistle, to foretell of a death.

Seven Whistles
Seven Whistles

Shiwanna

In Pueblo lore, Rain bringing cloud spirits, they were believed to have traveled on rainbows. Associated with the dead, they lived in many places.

Shiwanna
Shiwanna

Silkies

In English and Scottish folklore, are shape shifting sea fairies usually in the form of bright-eyed seals, often came on to land in human form, where they would dance, especially on the night of the full moon.

Silkies
Silkies

Sitri

Sitri or Bitru or Sytry, is a Great Prince of Hell, and reigns over sixty legions of demons. He causes men to love women and vice versa, and can make people bare themselves naked if desired. He is depicted with the face of a leopard and the wings of a griffin, but under the conjurer's request he changes into a very beautiful man.

Sitri
Sitri

Skadegamutc

In Native American lore, Mainly the Wabanaki people, Vampire ghost witch that can appear as a corpse or shape shift into a ball of light. This blood sucking monster is also known as a Ghost Witch. This creature is said to be an evil undead, that preys on those who fall behind. The Wabanaki believe this was once an evil sorcerer who practiced black magic and refused to die. To keep undead so to speak, the Skadegamutc needs to devour the flesh and blood of humans.

In daylight the Skadegamutc resembles that of a typical run of the mill zombie. Under the cover of darkness it morphs into a ball of light that travels the vast landscape in search of prey. There are two way this ghost witch attacks. One is to become undead at a fresh open air burial once all the mourners have completed the funeral ritual and are resting, the Skadegamutc attacks. The other is from the sky. It will fly around seeking someone who has fallen behind from a group. It will attack quickly and quietly. Devouring the warm flesh, drinking the blood.

Like traditional vampires, there are certain ways to prevent an attack. But the Skadegamutc is unique in a sense, although it is vulnerable during the day apparently it cannot be harmed by weapons. Given it is essentially a vampire slash witch, the only way to destroy it, is to burn the creature to charred ashes and scatter the ashes to the four winds.

Skadegamutc
Skadegamutc

Snarly Yow

In North American lore, a large, black, ghost dog that makes Maryland's South Mountain area its haunt; also known as the black dog.

Snarly Yow
Snarly Yow

Spunkie - Will-o'-the-Wisp

A will-o'-the-wisp. In the Scottish Highlands, where it would take the form of a linkboy, a boy who carried a flaming torch to light the way for pedestrians in exchange for a fee, or else simply a light that always seemed to recede, in order to lead unwary travelers to their doom. The spunkie has also been blamed for shipwrecks at night after being spotted on land and mistaken for a harbor light. Other tales of Scottish folklore regard these mysterious lights as omens of death or the ghosts of once living human beings. They often appeared over lochs or on roads along which funeral processions were known to travel.

Spunkie
Spunkie

Stigoi

In Romanian folklore, the spirits of troubled souls who have risen from the grave; ghosts who may transform their appearance.

Stigoi
Stigoi

Sundel Bolong

In Malaysian lore, the ghost of a beautiful woman who died while pregnant, giving birth while in the grave and who wanders the earth with long black hair and a hole in her back from the child's exit.

Sundel Bolong
Sundel Bolong

Teke Teke

In Japanese folklore, a vengeful ghost of a young woman whose body had been cut in half and who seeks to maim the living in the same way. It preys on young people who stray into her domain after dark. She chases down those in her sights, running on hands that make a teke-teke sound, as they slap the ground. Just looking at her invites a sentence of being sliced in half.

Teke Teke
Teke Teke

Thuyul

Thuyul is died unborn baby or died kids. They usually have owner, and they can steal money from someone's house. They look like a kid, with pale skin, bald, blackening eyes, and only using an underwear. People believe that there are some ways to prevent Thuyul steal their money. One of the ways is using some beans. Thuyul will count the beans again and again until they forget to steal the money. You can chase Thuyul, with using only underwear. A few years ago I heard that one of my neighbor who can see ghost, had ever seen Thuyul and chased the Thuyul. But he lost it.

Pocong
Pocong

Tikoloshe

In Zulu and South African folklore, can have the power to bestow great pain, illness and death upon its victims. Whilst small in stature, they are said to resemble zombies and the activity poltergeist like. It is said to cause great trouble where ever it roams. According to the Zulu, it can take on a bear humanoid form and can rape women and bite the toes of sleeping people.

Tikoloshe
Tikoloshe

Toyol or Tuyul

In South East Asian folklore, especially in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Singapore. is the twisted spirit of a small child who passed away before being born. Through ritualistic practices and black magic a witch doctor can invoke the spirit and bind it to an owner. A Toyol is used to run errands, create mischief, steal riches and rarely murder.

Toyol
Toyol

Trolls

In Scandinavian myth, trolls are ugly, malicious creatures and the enemies of mankind. They are much bigger and stronger than humans, and leave their caves only after dark to hunt. If they are exposed to sunlight they will instantly turn to stone. Trolls are very fond of human flesh. In later myths they are roughly the size of humans or elves, and thought to be the owners of buried treasures. They are sometimes, although very rarely, portrayed as friendly, less ugly creatures.

Trolls
Trolls

Tsukumogami

In Japanese folklore, a ghost that inhabits tools.

Tsukumogami
Tsukumogami

Vantoase

In Romanian folklore, feminine wind spirits that live in nature and cause wind storms.

Vantoase
Vantoase

Uwan

Uwan is an invisible Yokai that inhabits old houses and temples. His shouts can only ge heard inside the building. In the Edo period artists began painting images of Evarious invisible yokai.

Uwan
Uwan

Vetala

In Indian lore, an evil spirit that reanimates dead bodies and dwells in graveyards.

Vetala
Vetala

Whirlwinds

In Native American beliefs, especially of the Shoshoni, whirlwinds are thought to be apparitions of people.

Whirlwinds
Whirlwinds

Wild Hunt

In Norse mythology, a roaming, ghostly procession of hunters, their horses and dogs.

Wild Hunt
Wild Hunt

Windigo

In Native American mythology, a forest dwelling, human flesh eating entity.

Windigo
Windigo

Yurei

In Japanese culture, are perhaps the most terrifying Japanese creatures. These are the ghosts of the deceased and have been introduced to western culture through horror movies such as Ringu (The Ring) and Ju-On (The Grudge). Yurei have long, disheveled hair and appear wearing the clothes that they died or were buried in, such as white burial kimono. In some cases, they may haunt a specific person, but usually are tied to the place where they died. They are stuck between life and death, and can only move on when their unfinished business is resolved, much like ghosts in western mythology.

Yurei
Yurei

Zombie

In voodoo religion, a deceased person brought back to life by a voodoo sorcerer called a bokor, doing his or her bidding.

Zombie
Zombie

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